DVRCV Main Menu

You are here:

You are here

Our principles of practice

Our principles of practice

Our principles of practice

What we think and how we act


Violence prevention

  • All adults and children have the right to live free from violence. Violence is a violation of human rights
  • Both government and community have a responsibility to communicate that violence is unacceptable and, in some forms, illegal, and to work to prevent it
  • Community education programs which address gender inequality are important strategies in addressing relationship violence
  • Financial independence and access to adequate housing and childcare enhances women’s capacities to leave a violent partner and to rebuild their lives. Increasing women’s access to crisis support and legal remedies is a significant means of preventing violence
  • School education programs for boys and girls are essential in challenging traditional stereotypes about masculinity and femininity, teaching young people about respectful relationships, and that violence is unacceptable

Back to top


Intervention

  • A coordinated response to violence, across legal, health, child protection, welfare and other services, is the most effective response
  • Responses to violence must recognise that people have different experiences and needs due to their gender, race, class, age, cultural background, sexuality, and/or disability and other individual factors
  • The primary focus of intervention should be the safety of victims, rather than on either fixing or ending the family relationship
  • Victims should be supported no matter how they choose to respond to the violence (including if they decide to leave a relationship or stay, if they want to pursue legal charges or not)
  • Victims should be supported to remain in their own homes. They should not be made homeless through family violence. Victims should also have access to safe emergency housing if they need to escape a violent partner
  • Those who perpetrate violence are responsible for their behaviour and must be held accountable for it
  • Those who perpetrate violence are able to change their behaviour. The conditions which assist change include being held accountable for one’s actions, education and legal sanctions
  • Support groups and ongoing counselling are vital services in assisting victims to recover from the long-term trauma of violence

Back to top


The law

  • Many forms of violence are crimes. The criminal justice system must take the protection of victims seriously
  • Wherever possible, the legal system and services should listen to and respect the opinions of victims of violence (including child victims) regarding what will best meet their needs. However action may sometimes need to be taken to protect the immediate safety of victims, regardless of their wishes
  • In holding an offender legally accountable for violence, victims should not be put at risk of harm. The first priority of legal intervention should be to protect the victim (and children) from further harm

Back to top


Children and young people

  • Children and young people should be protected both from direct violence and from witnessing violence. When one parent is violent towards another, that person is also harming their child
  • Children and young people should be seen as clients in their own right. They should be provided with an independent advocate to ensure their views are heard
  • Children who have been abused by a parent, or who have witnessed abuse by a parent, should not be compelled to spend time with that parent, for example through custody and guardianship arrangements There should be a presumption of no-contact unless the parent is able to demonstrate that they are able to provide the child with a safe environment. This should be balanced with the wishes of the child/ren to see that parent
  • Non-offending parents should be supported to protect their children from violence, and should not be held responsible for the violence

Back to top


The words and language we use

There are many terms in use to refer to violence and abuse in intimate or family relationships, including family violence, domestic violence, child abuse and so on. They may be used on this site and elsewhere interchangeably. The word 'survivor' is often used instead of 'victim' when referring to someone who has experienced violence from another person, or they may be used together as 'victim/survivor'. The word 'perpetrator' is often used when referring to someone who uses violence against others.

Back to top