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DVRCV walk against family violence

DVRCV walk against family violence

Philippa and Lauren at the Walk Against Family Violence, 25 November 2014

On Tuesday 25 November, DVRCV staff joined 2,000 other supporters for the sixth annual 'Walk Against Family Violence' in Melbourne. The Walk was just one of many nation-wide events held to honour the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women.

Members of the No More Deaths Alliance handed out election score cards that rated political parties in the Victorian state election on their commitment to addressing family violence.

DVRCV's Executive Officer, Vig Geddes, said:

The number of people taking part in the march, and in other activities around International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women, demonstrated the level of concern in the community about violence against women.

The No More Deaths campaign has articulated 25 actions by government that we believe are needed to address violence against women.

These asks provide a blue print for action for whichever party is elected.

See the key asks of the No More Death campaign.

 

This is what domestic violence looks like in Australia

This is what domestic violence looks like in Australia

Source: infographic from 'This is what domestic violence looks like in Australia', Daily Life, 25/11/14 article below.

 

Media articles

This is what domestic violence looks like in Australia | Daily Life, 25/11/14

The women who deserve medals for their bravery | Clementine Ford, Daily Life, 25/11/14

Rosie Batty leads anti-family violence march in Melbourne CBD | Rebekah Cavanagh, Herald Sun, 25/11/14

'Family violence does not have a colour' | Lani Brennan, as told to Alice Williams, Daily Life, 24/11/14

White Ribbon Day sparks more than 1000 events across Australia in campaign against domestic violence | ABC Online, 24/11/14‎

 

International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women

November 25 was first chosen as a day of activism in 1981 by women in Latin America, who elected that day in memory of the three Mirabal sisters from the Dominican Republic who were assassinated because of their political activism in 1960. In 1991 a group of Canadian men declared 25 November as White Ribbon day in response to a man's murder of 14 women in Montreal. Since then it has grown into an international campaign to raise awareness amongst men and boys about the roles they can play to prevent violence against women. Men and women around the world wear a white ribbon or wristband as a visual symbol of their commitment to end violence against women. In 1999, the United Nations designated 25 November as International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women. This day also launches the 16 Days of Activism against Gender Violence, which runs through to Human Rights Day on 10 December. The 16 Days Campaign has been used as an organising strategy by individuals and groups around the world to call for the elimination of all forms of violence against women. 

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